Get Your Summer Planning Guide!

Summer is a wonderful time of year.  Summer days just seem to have a lot more flexibility than during the school year.  We have time to relax, go on adventures, and try new things.

I strive for a balanced summer schedule.  I enjoy many of the typical summer fun activities with my children.  Park outings.  Baking treats. Picnics.  Pools.

I do NOT enjoy playing cruise director for my family, though.  It isn’t fun for me, and quite frankly, it isn’t good for my kids.  They need time to use their imaginations, run around with the neighborhood kids, build forts, and be bored.

My 2017 word of the year is ‘Intentional’ and that applies to how we spend summer break too.  I want to intentionally give the kids lots of free time while sprinkling in fun activities.  This year I put together a summer planning guide to help remind me to plan a little summer fun.

Each week I will plan one outing, one activity, and one book.

This gets us out of the house a little bit, but it also ensures we do not become over-scheduled.  Summer is a respite from the busyness of the school year!

Weeks that I’m feeling a little extra-motivated, otherwise known as well rested, I might plan the activities around a common theme.  Coming up with themes doesn’t have to be complicated. Remember, we are trying to intentionally choose one outing, one activity, and one book. That is all.  If you want to do more than that, great!  But be care to avoid the slippery slope of playing cruise director.

Here are a few themes that Hannah and I came up with in just a few minutes.

Get your FREE summer planning guide! Check out these ideas for easy summer fun.

Summer Planning Guide
Themes

Theme:  Blueberries

Somewhere to GO: Support a local farm by going blueberry picking.
Something to DO: Bake a blueberry treat .
Something to READ: Blueberries for Sal by Robert McCloskey

Theme: 80’s summer

Somewhere to GO: Run through a sprinkler and slide down a slip n slide. (This is cheating a bit by staying home, but it is definitely something kids enjoy. The idea is to intentionally create some fun so adapt it as you need.)
Something to DO: Make popsicles.
Something to READ: Superfudge by Judy Blume

Theme:  Animals

Somewhere to GO:  Visit your local zoo.
Something to DO:  Make a bird feeder.
Something to READ:  The Day Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash by Trinka Hakes Noble

Theme:  Harry Potter

Somewhere to GO:  Check out a magic show.  Many rec centers and libraries host magicians in the summer so be sure the check your local calendars.
Something to DO:  Try a few chemistry experiments
Something to READ:  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling (or any of the Harry Potter series)

Theme:  Butterflies

Somewhere to GO:  Tour a butterfly garden
Something to DO:  Watch caterpillars turn into butterflies with this butterfly kit.
Something to READ: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Theme:  Outer Space

Somewhere to GO:  Go check out a planetarium
Something to DO:  Make galaxy slime
Something to READ:  The Magic School Bus Lost in the Solar System by Joanna Cole

Get your FREE summer planning guide! Check out these ideas for easy summer fun.

Most of our summer weeks will not have a theme.  We will just choose somewhere to go, something to do, and something to read.  That is good enough.  I’m striving for an intentional summer, not a perfect plan.

Are you tired of playing cruise director too?  You are in luck!  You can download and print my summer planning guide template and ideas just by joining my mailing list.  The download includes the template to keep you organized as well as 20 Somewhere to Go suggestions, 20 Something to DO suggestions, and 20 Something to READ suggestions!  All you need to do is pull an idea from each page and you are ready to have fun!

The sign up form for my mailing list is on the top right of the page.

You can download and print your own Summer Planning Guide by joining my mailing list!

I am going to just pop the Summer Fun planning guide in my lesson plan book for the summer.

How will you spend your summer days?  Leave your ideas in the comments!


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How to Use Khan Academy as a Math Curriculum

A few years ago we started using Khan Academy for Ben’s math curriculum.  He loves it because he can see exactly how much of his curriculum he has completed.  It motivates him to keep working.

When people find out that Ben uses Khan Academy, they ask how to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum.  I admit it.  Khan Academy can look confusing if you are used to a math book. There is a LOT of information on Khan Academy so it is easy to feel lost.

I will walk you through how to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum.

How to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum. Khan Academy is a free math curriculum. It is perfect for homeschool math lessons.

How to Use Khan Academy as a Math Curriculum

The first thing you need to do is sign up for a parent account.  Choose the ‘Parents, start here’ tab.

Enter your first and last name as well as your email address.  Khan Academy will send you updates, so be sure to use an email address that you actually check.  Check your email and confirm the address.

The confirmation email will include a link to create your parent account.

How to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum. Khan Academy is a free math curriculum. It is perfect for homeschool math lessons.

Next, you need to set up a child account.  You will set up one for each child that you want to use Khan Academy.

You will need to enter your child’s birthday because Khan Academy requires parents to manage the accounts of children under 13.   Once the birthday is entered, you will be prompted to enter in a username, password, grade level, and gender.

Now, log out and let your child log in.

When they log in for the first time they will get to choose their avatar. They will only be able to choose from a few options at first, but can change it as they complete lessons.

Scroll down and select ‘Math by Grade’.

Choose the grade level you think is best for your child.

How to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum. Khan Academy is a free math curriculum. It is perfect for homeschool math lessons.

Select ‘Start Mission’.

The first mission is a short quiz, called a mastery challenge, to see how much of the selected grade level math is already mastered.  Khan Academy wants to be sure your child is working at the correct level.

For every question they have the option to:
Type in the answer
Select “I haven’t learned this yet.”
Select “I’d like a hint.”
Watch a video if they are stuck.

How to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum. Khan Academy is a free math curriculum. It is perfect for homeschool math lessons.

Your student is now ready to use Khan Academy as their math curriculum!

After the first mastery challenge your child will see a screen that shows their progress and what skills still need to be mastered to complete the grade.

As skills are mastered, which is confirmed through the mastery challenges, the progress and skills lists are updated.  If a child gets a wrong answer for  a skill they have previously mastered, Khan Academy will just add those skills back into the lesson rotation.

How to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum. Khan Academy is a free math curriculum. It is perfect for homeschool math lessons.
I made up a new student so I could show you the steps.

Each day when your child logs in all they need to do is spend whatever time you require working through the tasks list.  I ask Ben to work for a minimum of thirty minutes each day.

Occasionally I do teach skills that are difficult for Ben.  If he doesn’t understand something after watching the videos, we bust out a few math manipulatives and work through the problem.  Khan Academy is free though, so that leaves room in the homeschool budget for manipulatives.

Ben loves Khan Academy because it feels like a challenge.  The mission progress motivates him to keep working and master the grade level as quickly as possible.  His personality type loves a challenge.

Hannah started out using Khan Academy, but found the mission progress percentile stressful.  She was afraid to answer questions incorrectly because it would deduct from her progress percentile.  It was not a good fit for her personality type.  Math Mammoth works much better for her.

Luckily, Khan Academy is free so there is no risk to giving it a try.

Have you ever used Khan Academy?  Do you have any questions about how to use Khan Academy as a math curriculum?

 


Organized Homeschooler is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com